Tags » ‘future’

The Future’s So Bright…

October 30th, 2012 by

The world of education has begun to shift.  Noted educator Will Richardson recently wrote in the New York Times that, because of the pervasiveness of the internet and the World Wide Web, “schools, like media, music, business, politics, and other industries… will have to change.”

Even though he says that no one now knows what will become of schools and the classroom by the end of this transformation, Mr. Richardson notes three touchstones as a starting point for parents and educators to involve themselves in the change – and to prepare students for it.

One of the ideas he finds central to “tomorrow’s” education is that the classroom will expand, or have, as he puts it, “thin walls”.  As our society becomes more and more connected – as our teens and tweens become more “plugged in”, we have to realize that the amount of learning taking place outside the traditional classroom setting is increasing exponentially.

So, what, as parents and educators, can we do to prepare our children and ourselves for this unprecedented change?

The first thing, and quite possibly the most important thing, we can do is to teach our children discernment.  Kids are very adept at scouring the web at younger and younger ages, and we need to give them the skills to navigate this world.  Up until now, the conversation has rested mostly on keeping kids safe online, and, while that is important, it isn’t enough anymore.  Kids need to understand how to find reliable information online; they need to understand that not everything they see is the truth.  This task of teaching discernment isn’t a new one for parents – they’ve been doing it for generations (eat this mushroom, aKids Get A Lot of Screen Timend not that) – the trick is that with the internet and World Wide Web, we are in heretofore uncharted territory.  We are in territory that is changing and evolving more and more rapidly with each passing year.  If we’re to teach Web skills to our kids, we had better have at least a basic handle on it ourselves.

The second thing we need to remember is that, even with society changing at an exponential pace, we still need to take time away from all the information.  Kids (and adults!) need to make sure that they have time to play, rest, relax, and engage with each other in a non-cyber fashion.  Screen time is becoming an addiction (think of TV addiction on steroids!) for many tweens and teens today.  It’s important as parents and educators to stop and model play and recreation behaviors for their kids and to schedule it into their lives.

We’re living in exciting times – Will Richardson says that there has never been a better time in the history of mankind to be a learner – the bounties that technology has to offer us and will continue to offer us in the future is breathtaking.  But, as parents and educators, we must meet the challenge with open eyes and open minds.

What is the future of Education?

September 26th, 2012 by

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately on what, exactly, the future of the American Education System is going to be, if we continue down the road we’re currently traveling… AND what the future could or should be, given our current level of technology development, social and cultural development, and the current damage being dealt to the next generation via our outdated, outmoded, and detrimental clinging to paradigms in education that were relevant 50 – 100 years ago, but are now counterproductive.

All this against the backdrop of my first experience as a PARENT within the education system… my child has just begun 1st grade…

Transforming an entrenched, funded, and “we’ve always done it this way” mindset within the education system is a daunting task.  Sometimes it feels too big, too overwhelming.  But, by the same measure, if someone – if I – don’t start, we’re going to have a real hot mess in (probably) less than a decade’s time.  Some folks think we already have a real hot mess now.

So, stop number one on this train ride, is thought provoking material from “The Innovative Educator” blog.  One teacher chimes in with “20 Things” – 20 insider observations – that he thinks outsiders should know about the education system… and another teacher comments on each of the 20 items. They don’t always agree, but the sum of their observations sheds much light on what is going wrong, or is about to go wrong, in today’s schools.

20 Things an Educator Wants the Nation to Know About Education

What do you think?