Tags » ‘possibility’

What It’s All About

July 4th, 2013 by

thoughtfullbb

Reposted from my other blog at CreateMotivate.com

 

Sometimes we lose sight of the big picture. Sometimes we need a slap in the head from the Universe to remind us – not of what we’re doing – but why we’re doing what we do. Our “busy-ness” comes from the what. Our fire comes from the “why”.

 

Nice Day for a Ball Game

It was a gorgeous Saturday morning in our fair city. And the championship game was on. Some of you know that, in addition to working in the education field, I have also moonlighted as a Little League baseball coach for the past four years. Four years ago, I didn’t even like baseball… but that’s another story altogether.

I coach the little guys… six and seven year-olds, fresh out of T-Ball. Our division is known as “Single A”… or, basically, the “little guys”. I’m happy with that division because, at that level, it’s not so much about winning as it is about learning basic skills and having fun. Once you get into the upper divisions,

it, sadly, becomes all about winning.

On this particular Saturday, I was watching the championship game of the AAA division (10 – 12 year-olds). It wasn’t just the league championship. It was the city championship. It was the first place team of our league (the American League) versus the first place team of our cross-town rival (the National League). One of the kids on the American League team was older brother to one of the little guys on our Single-A team, and he had helped us throughout the season with basic baseball skills, so I wanted to get out and support him in the city championship.

By the time I arrived, the game was already underway.

 

What Did You Just Call Me?

“Hey Coach!” said the man a couple of people down from me in the crowd (even after four years, I still find it a bit unnerving that grown men will call you ‘coach’ when they see you).

“Hey there…” I recognized the man’s face, but I couldn’t place it. I knew that I had met him somewhere in baseball, but couldn’t place him. I hate it when that happens.

I continued to watch the game. One of our batters came up – I recognized him. Miles. I had known him as a member of one of the opposing Single-A teams two or three years back. And, last year, I had a chance to coach him when I took on the managing duties for the league’s 9-year-old “runner up” All-Star Team (a team made up of the twelve second-best 9 year-old players). The “runner-up” (or B-Team as they were called) All Star-Team was a job that no one really wanted to take on, but I agreed to after a conversation with the league president saying that they wouldn’t get to play in any tournaments if no one agreed to coach them… and, like Obi-Wan in the original Star Wars, I was the last best hope for them to continue into the post-season.

Then it hit me… the man who had spoken to me earlier was Miles’ father. It figured that I didn’t remember him that well… the “B Team” had only spent about 3 weeks together – enough to practice and play in 2 or 3 postseason tournaments.

Between innings, Miles’ father came up to me again and provided one of those “smacks to the head” of which I spoke before.

 

A Friendly Smack In The Head From the Universe

“You know,” he started. “Miles wouldn’t be playing today if it wasn’t for you.”

“Unhh….” With conversation starters like these, I’m never sure exactly what to say.

“After last season, he was ready to quit baseball,” Miles’ dad said. “But because of your positive coaching of the All-Star Team – well, he’s back this year.”

And playing in the city championship, I thought.

At that point, it’s hard to describe what I felt. Pride. Humility. Affirmation. Significance.

And then it hit me, this is why I do what I do.

The whole point is making a difference in the lives of the children and youth that I touch.

And, honestly, I believe that making a difference is the ultimate payoff for 90% of the teachers, coaches, rec specialists… all those who work with children and youth.

But it’s so easy to forget.

Miles may not grow up to play in the major leagues (but then, again, after seeing the way he deftly handled a line drive coming at 50 mph toward his head in the bottom of the sixth, maybe he will). But that’s not the important part. Sure, no matter if his baseball career ends tomorrow or at a retirement of his jersey from the San Francisco Giants in the year2045, I’ll be proud of the small part I played in his development. The real brass tacks of the matter is that I made a difference in this kid’s life.

 

And Here’s the Real Secret of Your Universe

pushups

The killer bottom line here is that, if you work with kids, children, youth… anyone in a mentor-like capacity, you’re making that same difference with them every day you show up.

And my guess is that you don’t remember that you make that difference… at least you don’t remember more than you do.

One of the earliest thought-leaders I can remember learning from in the educational field is Betsey Haas. Her tag line is “I make the difference.”

Go write that down on an index card and put it in your pocket. Or, better yet, in your shoe. Anywhere you’ll notice it. And remember that whether you know it or not, whether you get feedback on it or not, you make the difference.

Games Teachers Play (good ones)

October 3rd, 2012 by

Games Teachers Play - Book CoverI’m very excited and pleased to announce the release of my book “Games Teachers Play Before the Bell Rings” – a fun book that contains 10 games to stretch the imagination of those who work with children and youth… and to transform how we, as teachers, see the world.  The goal of the games is to bring the teacher new awareness into the art and power of their unique position and to enable them to speed along the road from “good” to “great”.

Until October 5th, you can download a FREE Kindle version of the book here.

After October 5th, it will still be available for the bargain price of $2.99.

Here is to teachers who are self-aware, conscious, and consciously making a difference!

What is the future of Education?

September 26th, 2012 by

I’ve been doing a lot of thinking lately on what, exactly, the future of the American Education System is going to be, if we continue down the road we’re currently traveling… AND what the future could or should be, given our current level of technology development, social and cultural development, and the current damage being dealt to the next generation via our outdated, outmoded, and detrimental clinging to paradigms in education that were relevant 50 – 100 years ago, but are now counterproductive.

All this against the backdrop of my first experience as a PARENT within the education system… my child has just begun 1st grade…

Transforming an entrenched, funded, and “we’ve always done it this way” mindset within the education system is a daunting task.  Sometimes it feels too big, too overwhelming.  But, by the same measure, if someone – if I – don’t start, we’re going to have a real hot mess in (probably) less than a decade’s time.  Some folks think we already have a real hot mess now.

So, stop number one on this train ride, is thought provoking material from “The Innovative Educator” blog.  One teacher chimes in with “20 Things” – 20 insider observations – that he thinks outsiders should know about the education system… and another teacher comments on each of the 20 items. They don’t always agree, but the sum of their observations sheds much light on what is going wrong, or is about to go wrong, in today’s schools.

20 Things an Educator Wants the Nation to Know About Education

What do you think?

Restarting the Conversation

August 31st, 2009 by

Over the summer, we let the ball drop.

We have spent the past three (really? has it been three?) years working with the kids in our afterschool program in the context of the Josephson Institute’s CHARACTER COUNTS program.   At times using curriculum from the Instititute, and most of the time crafting our own relatable curriculum around the six pillars (Trustworthiness, Respect, Responsibility, Fairness, Caring, and Citizenship), we’ve spent a fair amount of time engaging the children in the meaning and import of these abstract ideas.cc-bnr-6pillar

Then, for some reason… call it laziness, failure to plan, summer overwhelm, whatever… we stopped talking about the pillars this past summer.  And guess what?  The ideas and behaviors that had become a daily “given” at the site (older kids helping younger, sharing, and a sense of community) simply fell out of existence.

The beautiful thing is, now that the school year is underway, and we’re back to a more normalized (ritualized) schedule, the pillars have once again become part of the conversation.  We opened with our first “Word of the Week” (WOW) and we chose the one word that sums up what it is we’re up to as a group:  COMMUNITY.

Lo, and behold- as if a magic switch were flipped, the kids are back in the swing of things.

Or, I should say, the kids are back in the conversation.

Not a casual, one-on-one conversation, but the conversation.

The conversation is made up of all the hundreds (if not thousands) of smaller daily words, actions, and conversations between the teachers and kids (and the teachers and teachers and the kids and kids as well).

I once took a course that tantalizingly held out the maxim that “the only way to transform an organization, is to raise the level of the conversation.”  When we talk with kids and keep them in THE CONVERSATION, we keep our community in existence.  Instead of looking to find ways to make children “behave”, perhaps we should be looking for ways to raise the conversation.

What if we could give our kids this?

May 14th, 2009 by

This video is 16 minutes long, but worth every second spent.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cbk980jV7Ao]

Stuck In The Forest

December 31st, 2008 by

Free Interior Design

I recently learned of an experience where a Luisa, a community citzen, who had had two children go through the world of after-school care, offered to take on a project- for free -  to organize a volunteer interior designer and coordinate donations to transform the environment of a local SAC center into “something of beauty, something that would inspire the kids and the staff each day when they came to this place.”  Now, I don’t know about you, but most after-school sites I’ve visited (and, yes, I’ll include my own on this list) tend to be a bit institutional-looking, with hand-me-down everythings, and not much going on in the arena of aesthetic interior design.  I was excited to see how this project would progress. 

Do You Want It?

While she garnered the support of the director of the site, she encountered stiff opposition from the agency’s manager.  Reasons cited for the opposition ranged from concerns with state licensing to volunteer vetting to simply “that’s not the way we’ve always done it.”  I spoke with her after her meeting with the agency manager, and felt sorry for her.  She came to this agency with a “gift” in her hand, and was turned away- and told every reason why it wouldn’t work.  I encouraged her to find another agency or program and offer it again- not every agency could be as closed-minded as this first one, right?  Or could it?

I was upset at the lack of vision of the manager. 

Do I close off possibility?

And then I got to thinking.  How many times had I, at my own site, closed off vision, taken myself out of being present to possibilities when they’re presented to me?  Just a couple weeks ago, a staff member approached me with some thoughts about rearranging our site’s daily schedule… and what was my initial reaction?  It was a huge NO.  Of course, I didn’t yell that horrid two-letter word at the requesting staff member, but I made my firm opposition clear.  Inside my head, the voices were shouting and rebelling against the idea.

Fortunately, after my change-resistant, “we’ve always done it this way” internal dialogue finally quieted, I went back to the staff member and explained my reaction, apologized for being so instantaneously inflexible, and told her that I might need some time to digest the idea, but I wanted to leave it open for discussion.

How many times do we resist any change, any suggestion that possibilities exist for transforming what exists in the now into something more inspirational?  I challenge you to find your automatic “NO” spots, listen more closesly in the coming weeks for possibilities that call to you, and let things that move and inspire you have more space at the table than the comfort of “how it’s always been done.”

As for Luisa, I hope that she finds an organization or agency that is open enough to possibility to see what she brings as a gift- not a challenge to the status quo.  Thanks for your gift, Luisa.